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 Bill Status of SB2889  100th General Assembly


Short Description:  EPINEPHRINE ADMINISTRATION ACT

Senate Sponsors
Sen. Chapin Rose

Hearings
Public Health Hearing Apr 24 2018 4:00PM Capitol 400 Springfield, IL - Senate Floor Amendment 2


Last Action
DateChamber Action
  4/10/2018SenatePlaced on Calendar Order of 3rd Reading April 11, 2018

Statutes Amended In Order of Appearance
New Act
105 ILCS 5/22-30


Synopsis As Introduced
Creates the Epinephrine Administration Act. Provides that a health care practitioner may prescribe epinephrine pre-filled syringes in the name of an authorized entity where allergens capable of causing anaphylaxis may be present. Provides that an authorized entity may acquire and stock a supply of undesignated epinephrine pre-filled syringes provided the undesignated epinephrine pre-filled syringes are stored in a specified location. Requires each employee, agent, or other individual of the authorized entity to complete a specified training program before using a pre-filled syringe to administer epinephrine. Provides that a trained employee, agent, or other individual of the authorized entity may either provide or administer an epinephrine pre-filled syringe to a person whom the employee, agent, or other individual believes in good faith is experiencing anaphylaxis. Provides that training under the Act shall be valid for 2 years. Requires the Department of Public Health to approve training programs, to list the approved programs on the Department's website, and to include links to training providers' websites on the Department's website. Contains provisions concerning costs, limitations, and rulemaking. Defines terms. Amends the School Code. In provisions concerning epinephrine administration, provides that epinephrine may be administered with a pre-filled syringe. Makes conforming changes.

Senate Committee Amendment No. 1
Deletes reference to:
New Act
Adds reference to:
410 ILCS 27/1
410 ILCS 27/5
410 ILCS 27/10
410 ILCS 27/15
410 ILCS 27/20
410 ILCS 620/3.21from Ch. 56 1/2, par. 503.21

Replaces everything after the enacting clause. Reinserts the provisions of the introduced bill with the following changes: Amends the Epinephrine Auto-Injector Act and changes the short title to the Epinephrine Injector Act. Makes a corresponding change in the Illinois Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. Defines "epinephrine injector" as including an auto-injector for the administration of epinephrine or a pre-filled syringe used for the administration of epinephrine that contains a pre-measured dose of epinephrine that is equivalent to the dosages used in an auto-injector. Deletes the definition for "epinephrine auto-injector". Changes references from "epinephrine auto-injector" to "epinephrine injector". Removes the provisions creating the Epinephrine Administration Act.

Actions 
DateChamber Action
  2/14/2018SenateFiled with Secretary by Sen. Chapin Rose
  2/14/2018SenateFirst Reading
  2/14/2018SenateReferred to Assignments
  2/21/2018SenateAssigned to Public Health
  2/27/2018SenatePostponed - Public Health
  3/2/2018SenateSenate Committee Amendment No. 1 Filed with Secretary by Sen. Chapin Rose
  3/2/2018SenateSenate Committee Amendment No. 1 Referred to Assignments
  3/13/2018SenateSenate Committee Amendment No. 1 Assignments Refers to Public Health
  3/13/2018SenateSenate Committee Amendment No. 1 Adopted
  3/14/2018SenateDo Pass as Amended Public Health; 007-000-000
  3/14/2018SenatePlaced on Calendar Order of 2nd Reading April 10, 2018
  4/10/2018SenateSecond Reading
  4/10/2018SenatePlaced on Calendar Order of 3rd Reading April 11, 2018
  4/11/2018SenateSenate Floor Amendment No. 2 Filed with Secretary by Sen. Chapin Rose
  4/11/2018SenateSenate Floor Amendment No. 2 Referred to Assignments
  4/17/2018SenateSenate Floor Amendment No. 2 Assignments Refers to Public Health

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